Metropolis Theater presents

Nikolai Gogol's farcical short story follows the format of a diary to chronicle the descent of the protagonist, Poprishchin, into insanity.

A Suzi Bass Nominated Performance For Lead Actor

"Directed by Prodan Dimov, Hayden perfectly captures Gogol’s bleak humor and generally pessimistic outlook on human affairs through his confident and intimate recounting of events that he’s not perceiving accurately. Still, as in the story, we long to trust the vision of the teller, but we have no other guideposts other than Poprishchin’s words themselves. It’s an irony that Hayden captures well, and Gogol’s slyly bleak humor emerges with clarity and immediacy. Ultimately, Hayden gives the great short story and its events vivid, compact life." — Andrew Alexander, Arts ATL "The energy that Jon Hayden projects to the audience is beyond all limits as he draws you in from one scene to the next. How would I rate this one? I think if Evgeny Lebedev were sitting in the audience he would be the first to rise up in applause. Jon Hayden reprised the role of this worker who goes off his rocker. And it is an incredible job. Not only is this a one-man show and he has to recall every line of a 90 minute diatribe, but he also has to waiver back and forth through several personalities as he recites his diary entries." — Robert Heller, Arts Atlanta Scene "Director Dimov's sleek staging flourishes..." "Hayden's brave performance as the schizophrenic monologist is a physical and vocal workout." — Bert Osborne, Sunday Paper

This performance is a tragicomedy
appropriate for ages 10 and older.

An Actors' Equity Association Production

© 2016 Metropolis Theater, Inc. All rights reserved.

Website design by Carabetta Hayden Design, Inc.

Nikolai Gogol's farcical short story follows the format of a diary to chronicle the descent of the protagonist, Poprishchin, into insanity.
"Directed by Prodan Dimov, Hayden perfectly captures Gogol’s bleak humor and generally pessimistic outlook on human affairs through his confident and intimate recounting of events that he’s not perceiving accurately. Still, as in the story, we long to trust the vision of the teller, but we have no other guideposts other than Poprishchin’s words themselves. It’s an irony that Hayden captures well, and Gogol’s slyly bleak humor emerges with clarity and immediacy. Ultimately, Hayden gives the great short story and its events vivid, compact life." — Andrew Alexander, Arts ATL "The energy that Jon Hayden projects to the audience is beyond all limits as he draws you in from one scene to the next. How would I rate this one? I think if Evgeny Lebedev were sitting in the audience he would be the first to rise up in applause. Jon Hayden reprised the role of this worker who goes off his rocker. And it is an incredible job. Not only is this a one-man show and he has to recall every line of a 90 minute diatribe, but he also has to waiver back and forth through several personalities as he recites his diary entries." — Robert Heller, Arts Atlanta Scene "Director Dimov's sleek staging flourishes..." "Hayden's brave performance as the schizophrenic monologist is a physical and vocal workout." — Bert Osborne, Sunday Paper
Nikolai Gogol's farcical short story follows the format of a diary to chronicle the descent of the protagonist, Poprishchin, into insanity. "Directed by Prodan Dimov, Hayden perfectly captures Gogol’s bleak humor and generally pessimistic outlook on human affairs through his confident and intimate recounting of events that he’s not perceiving accurately. Still, as in the story, we long to trust the vision of the teller, but we have no other guideposts other than Poprishchin’s words themselves. It’s an irony that Hayden captures well, and Gogol’s slyly bleak humor emerges with clarity and immediacy. Ultimately, Hayden gives the great short story and its events vivid, compact life." — Andrew Alexander, Arts ATL "The energy that Jon Hayden projects to the audience is beyond all limits as he draws you in from one scene to the next. How would I rate this one? I think if Evgeny Lebedev were sitting in the audience he would be the first to rise up in applause. Jon Hayden reprised the role of this worker who goes off his rocker. And it is an incredible job. Not only is this a one-man show and he has to recall every line of a 90 minute diatribe, but he also has to waiver back and forth through several personalities as he recites his diary entries." — Robert Heller, Arts Atlanta Scene "Director Dimov's sleek staging flourishes..." "Hayden's brave performance as the schizophrenic monologist is a physical and vocal workout." — Bert Osborne, Sunday Paper